Reference Catalog

The NHVRC Reference Catalog features home visiting research and evaluation conducted outside of the resource center. Items include evaluation plans, research briefs, conference and poster presentations, cost studies, and fact sheets. Select one or more of the checkboxes below and/or enter keywords into the search tool to refine the entries displayed. Inclusion in the NHVRC Reference Catalog does not constitute an endorsement of the product, in whole or in part, or its authors. Please see the bottom of the page for additional information, including our process for selecting items.

Topics
Title
Date
Description
Program Models Included

A Pedagogical Framework for Facilitating Parents’ Learning in Nurse-Parent Partnership

2017

Nursing work increasingly demands forms of expertise that complement specialist knowledge. In child and family nursing, this need arises when nurses work in partnership with parents of young children at risk. Partnership means working with parents in respectful, negotiated and empowering ways. Existing partnership literature emphasizes communicative and relational skills, but this paper focuses on nurses’ capacities to facilitate parents’ learning. Referring to data from home visiting, day-stay and specialist toddler clinic services in Sydney, a pedagogical framework is presented. Analysis shows how nurses notice aspects of children, parents and parent-child interactions as a catalyst for building on parents’ strengths, enhancing guided chance or challenging unhelpful constructs. Prior research shows the latter can be a sticking point in partnership, but this paper reveals diverse ways in which challenges are folded into learning process that position parents as agents of positive change. Noticing is dependent on embodied and communicative expertise, conceptualized in terms of sensory and reported channels. The framework offers a new view of partnership as mind-expanding for the parent and specifies the nurse’s role in facilitating this process. (author abstract)

Other Models

A Pilot Program to Offer a One-Time Home Visit to All Mothers with Newborns in Massachusetts

2014

Purpose: Provide an overview of the Welcome Family program, a pilot program offering one-time home visit to all mothers with newborns in Massachusetts.
Example Topics Addressed:
Systems of care to improve maternal and child health outcomes
Resources nurses offer families
The impact of real-time assessment of implementation and continued quality improvement

Other Models

A Qualitative Exploration of Co-location as an Intervention to Strengthen Home Visiting Implementation in Addressing Maternal Child Health

2018

Objectives: The aim of this paper is to explore the process and impact of co-locating evidence-based maternal and child service models to inform future implementation efforts. Methods: As part of a state-wide evaluation of maternal and child home visiting programs, we conducted semi-structured interviews with administrators and home visitors from home visiting agencies across Pennsylvania. We collected 33 interviews from 4 co-located agencies. We used the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR) to describe the key elements mitigating implementation of multiple home visiting models. Results: A primary advantage of co-location described by participants was the ability to increase the agency’s base of eligible clients through the implementation of a model with different program eligibility (e.g. income, child age) than the existing agency offering. Model differences related to curriculum (e.g. content or intensity/meeting frequency) enabled programs to more selectively match clients to models. To recruit eligible clients, new models were able to build upon the existing service networks of the initial program. Co-location provided organizational opportunities for shared trainings, enabling administrative efficiencies and collaborative staff learning. Programs implemented strategies to build synergies with complementary model features, for instance using the additional program option to serve waitlisted clients and to transition services after one model is completed. Conclusions for Practice: Considerable benefits are experienced when home visiting models co-locate. This research builds on literature encouraging collaboration among community agencies and provides insight on a specific facilitative approach. This implementation strategy informs policy across the social services spectrum and competitive funding contexts. (author abstract)

Early Head Start, Home Visiting (EHS-HV), Healthy Families America (HFA), Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP), Parents as Teachers (PAT)

A Report on Risk Characteristics Among Young Children and Families in the Baby TALK Demonstration Program: 2008-2010, with Select Comparative Local, State, and National Data from 2003-2010

2011

Baby TALK, Inc. is a nationally recognized organization, known for its innovative intervention model that supports young children and their families. In 1986, the Baby TALK model was developed in Baby TALK, Inc.’s largest demonstration program in Decatur, Illinois. Since then, the model has been replicated in early childhood programs within 36 states and Canada. Additionally, the Illinois State Board of Education has approved the use of the Baby TALK model in statewide early childhood settings because of its research-based, intensive approach for serving young children birth to three years in age.

This publication is the first installment of a series of reports and scholarly articles that will examine the Baby TALK model, the various components of the model, and the ways in which the model is used to aid highrisk families. In this research brief, we examine the risk characteristics of children and families in the Baby TALK demonstration program and compare those characteristics with demographic data at the county, state, and federal level. In short, this brief provides empirical evidence indicating the Baby TALK model does identify and serve a high-risk population in the demonstration program. (author description)

Other Models

Adverse Childhood Experiences and Postpartum Depression in Home Visiting Programs: Prevalence, Association, and Mediating Mechanisms

2018

Objectives: In this study, we examined the prevalence of postpartum depression (PPD) and its association with select demographic factors and antenatal conditions. We also investigated whether greater exposure to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) is associated with PPD, and if antenatal conditions mediate the ACE-PPD relationship. Methods: Data were collected from 735 low-income women receiving home visiting services. Descriptive and bivariate analyses provided estimates of PPD and its correlates, and nested path analyses were used to test for mediation. Results: We found that rates of PPD were high compared to prevalence estimates in the general population. Sample rates of antenatal depression were even higher than the rates of PPD. Omnibus tests revealed that PPD did not vary significantly by maternal age or race/ethnicity, although Hispanic women consistently reported the lowest rates. American Indian women and non-Hispanic white women reported the highest rates. PPD was significantly associated with increased exposure to ACEs. Nested path models revealed that the effects of ACEs were partially mediated by three antenatal conditions: intimate partner violence (IPV), perceived stress, and antenatal depression. Conclusions for Practice: Supporting prior research, rates of PPD appear to be high among low-income women. ACEs may increase the risk of antenatal IPV and psychological distress, both of which may contribute to PPD. The findings have implications for screening and assessment as well as the timing and tailoring of interventions through home visiting and other community-based services. (author abstract)

Early Head Start, Home Visiting (EHS-HV), Healthy Families America (HFA), Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP), Parents as Teachers (PAT)

Alabama Evaluation Plan

2011

Purpose: Describe families that leave home visiting programs and their reasons for departure.
Example Topics Addressed:
Comparison of families that leave home visiting programs with families that remain enrolled
Factors that either promote or inhibit relationships between home visitors and clients

Home Instruction for Parents of Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY), Parents as Teachers (PAT)

Alabama Evaluation Plan

2013

Purpose: Analyze programmatic and administrative data to describe family and child risk typologies.
Example Topics Addressed:
Risk typologies related to family and child experience histories
Differences in risk typologies between children with better health and developmental outcomes compared with others in the cohort

Parents as Teachers (PAT)

An Early Look at Families and Local Programs in the Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program Evaluation-Strong Start: Third Annual Report

2017

Purpose: Examine baseline characteristics of families and local home visiting programs in the Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program Evaluation (MIHOPE)-Strong Start study.
Example Topics Addressed:
Description of 1,221 families
Characteristics of local programs participating in the study
Process for recruiting local programs to participate in the study

Healthy Families America (HFA), Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP)

Arizona Evaluation Plan

2011

Purpose: Assess collaborative approaches associated with strengthened infrastructure.
Example Topics Addressed:
Relationship between implementation of an Inter-Agency Leadership Team and changes in levels of collaboration and networking
Description of systems change strategies implemented and their relationship with changes in infrastructure development

Healthy Families America (HFA), Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP)

Arizona Evaluation Plan

2011

Purpose: Assess maternal and child outcomes for families served by Family Spirit.
Example Topics Addressed:
If program participants improve outcomes in psychosocial domains

Family Spirit

All products are independently reviewed by two researchers using a standard protocol. Program models listed by name in the catalog meet criteria for evidence of effectiveness as determined by the Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness project (HomVEE). Program models that do not meet HomVEE criteria are included in the “Other Models” category. The HealthySteps model can no longer be implemented with MIECHV funds. Learn more on our models page.